Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Talking Tuesday

I'm going to try something different, let's call it "Talking Tuesday".

Working my way through the Washington Post this morning, I read the article 'Pentagon Rethinks Photo Ban on Coffins Bearing War Dead'. The link is here.

As a mom, my gut says NO! I believe this ban needs to remain as is. My fear is the media exploiting, an already tragic situation. We know there is human cost in war. However, when the plane touches down at Dover and the coffin is removed...it is not national moment, it is a private family moment.

Please share your thoughts regarding this controversial issues. It matters not, if you love a soldier...or even if you know a soldier. How do you feel about this ban?

13 comments:

Tonjia said...

I can kind of understand Pres Obamas thoughts about this topic but I still feel that these soldiers and their families need the respect of not having the media anywhere near when these coffins arrive in the US.

I agree with you AM, it should be a private moment.

Fragrant Liar said...

I'm pretty conflicted by this. On the one hand, I agree, this is a private moment.

However, on the other hand -- and I lean pretty hard this way -- these soldiers died for their country, and their country needs to see what freedom really costs. The less we see of the coffins, hard as it is to see them, the easier we can pretend things are not that bad, that the casualties of war are just numbers, not real people with families who will now grieve for them till the end of their days.

This goes whether you agree with the war or not, in my book. It's a difficult thing to see, but I think it's necessary for the American public to be totally aware or we risk numbing out to the real value of their/our loss.

Like HIV/AIDS. Who's really paying attention to that anymore? Not nearly as many as should.

lolaberly said...

I feel very strongly that the ban should be removed, but with the stipulation that media involvement is at the discretion of the family.

God forbid something happens to my husband, but if something did, I would want the picture of him coming home for all to see. He is proud of what he is doing and of his country and I think everyone would be better knowing his passion.

That said, I would never do that, solely because he is the type of soldier who hates attention. He would rather keep his head down and do his work than be showy about it.

Just my two cents. :)

Trukindog said...

That's a tough one, I think only the family's of all military personel can make the final decission on this.

I feel that (1) distant photo for the media to share to announce the arrival would be enough. NO VIDEO !

k said...

hi momma -
i read the article and thought the point that families do not all want the photos to be done should be enough to ban them. if a family feels strongly that they want their son or daughter's coffin photographed and put in the washington post, they always have the option to make that call to the paper and arrange it. just not right off the plane - they could invite the paper to the funeral. i think since some families do not want it, that has to be respected.

Alice said...

It's not something I have really thought about before, but now being in a military family...I can see that it is an important issue. I think the family should have ultimate say. You are right, this is for the families and whatever they feel comfortable doing should be respected.

Laura said...

Hard topic, personally I would want that picture FOR ME and my family NOT TO SHARE with the general public. It's a family moment and the rest of the funeral would be too. If it's to be shared with the rest of the public the family should be the one to have final say.
Laura, A Military Mom

Mary said...

AM,

Here in Canada, the Prime Minister put a ban on press when the coffins came in to Camp Petawawa in Ontario. There was such a hue and cry over it from the public that he removed the ban. Now, it is up to the soldier's family if press are allowed or not. I feel this is a good compromise. Then the family can decide if they want it to be private or public. There have been families that have chosen both ways.

Blessings,
Mary

MightyMom said...

first off, you must tell me how many cuss words I'm allowed before you cut me off....


ok...I'll go back and delete the cuss words...or most of them deal??


I have a REAL BIG problem with our current media. Especially in the way that they treat the families and victims of tragedy. Not just our military but any poor soul suddenly thrust into tragedy. Suddenly these poor souls have reporters hounding their homes and calling their cell phones for that oh so precious quote. That sound byte that the media can then critique and expound upon.

(remember, I've deleted a whole bunch of swear words here)
get the camera out of the widow's face, you ______. Do not call or visit a greiving family's home.

And by all that is Holy, Do Not, and I mean Do NOT rush around trying to be the first one to photograph a coffin.


Did you know. at new years John Travolta's son died. There is video of a coffin being loaded from the funeral home that held his son...and driven to the airport...and loaded into a plane.

It was only after the family was safely in the air that the media was told the whole thing was a farce. His son had been cremated and traveled with the family back to Fla to be buried.

Why in the bloody Hell should a person have to go to such enormous lengths to protect their grief from prying eyes???????


AND YOU WANT TO DO THIS TO OUR HEROIC MILITARY????!!!!!


!@@###E$%^^*%*^&(()*()(^&$%#$%$^^&%^&%#$


(did you get my drift there?)

MightyMom said...

oh and I wrote that before I read the other comments. So now I have to address them....just a bit.


I'm sorry folks but either I'm cynical or you're naieve. I honestly believe that if there is no official ban those pictures will be out there, on the news...on youtube...in the paper whether the family wants them or not.

tis better to never have them taken in the first place. If you'd like a picture of your serviceperson coming home then either bring your camera or ask someone else to.

honest oshkosh.

MightyMom said...

oh and I wrote that before I read the other comments. So now I have to address them....just a bit.


I'm sorry folks but either I'm cynical or you're naieve. I honestly believe that if there is no official ban those pictures will be out there, on the news...on youtube...in the paper whether the family wants them or not.

tis better to never have them taken in the first place. If you'd like a picture of your serviceperson coming home then either bring your camera or ask someone else to.

honest oshkosh.

Jean said...

My personal opinion is I'd rather the media not have the freedom to the photos of our precious soldier's as they come home in a coffin. I agree with the ban staying as is. We are a very private family and grieve privately.

However, I think the families should have the choice to make that decision.

Grandma Elaine said...

It is probably easier to have a ban than to have to monitor the media. If they could be trusted to handle things with respect, it would be fine, but they can't. By the way thanks for visiting my blog, and I must admit-little Jackson's Grandpa was a Navy man!